Wyoming Facts and History

Abbreviated as WY, Wyoming is one of the 48 states of the United States of America, territory from 1860 to 1890, vast 253,616 sq km: it is between 41 ° and 45 ° of latitud. N. and 104 ° 3 ′ and 111 ° 3 ′ longitud. O. (purely mathematical limits), bordering the states of South Dakota and Nebraska to the east; with Colorado and Utah to the south; with Idaho and Montana to the west and Montana to the north. It is one of the most troubled and interesting states from a morphological and geological point of view: the northernmost reaches of the Southern Rockies with the Laramie Mountains (2300-2500 m.) Of crystalline nature, sloping down towards the eastern plain, affect the southern part of the territory. regular slope, the Medicine Bow Range and Park Range (maximum height 3700 m.), undulating platform of the Precambrian, with vast ancient glacial manifestations. Continuing northwards, the vast Wyoming basin, which from a structural point of view looks like a series of basins composed of Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks, with an enormous diffusion of Eocene sands and clays, a basin limited to the north by the southern chains of the Rocky Central, such as the Wind River Range, an undulating platform of granite (3500-3900 m.), deeply engraved by the waters of the Green and Wind rivers. Separated from the valley of the latter, a large horseshoe-shaped chain extends towards the east, convex towards the south, enclosing the Big Horn Basin, consisting of the Big Horn Mountains (m. 4013) and the Absaroka Mountains, composed of primary soils. and secondary strongly folded and covered by a thick tertiary volcanic expansion, Yellowstone National Park (8500 sq km), at the northwestern end of the state. The hydrography is of the centrifugal type, sending Wyoming waters to Columbia, via the Snake River; to Colorado by means of the Green River; to Missouri (Mississippi) by the North Platte and Yellowstone rivers. The climate is very varied due to the tormented morphological conditions: in the semi-arid continental complex with cold winters: in January in Sheridan (1135 m) −7 °, 1; at Lander (1637 m.) −7 °, 7; at Yellowstone Park (d. 1901) −7 °, 7; summer is temperate, having in July 19th, 8th; 20 °; 16th, 3 respectively. The rainfall is decidedly scarce, except for the mountainous areas: in Sheridan 382 mm. per year; to Lander 321; in Yellowstone Park 458 with a prevalence of spring, for which artificial irrigation is indispensable.

The overall population of the state has risen from 9118 residents in 1870 to 92,531 in 1900, to 194,402 in 1920, to 225,565 in 1930 (94.9% of Whites; 0.6% of Negroes; 4.5% of other races including 7174 Mexicans; 1845 Indians and 1026 Japanese). The white element born abroad is scarce (19,658 individuals), mainly English, Swedish, Germans, Russians, Canadians, Italians (1653). The population lives in 24 counties, mostly in modest centers, exceeding 10,000 residents only Casper (16,619 inhabitants in 1930) and Cheyenne (17,361).

The number of farms it rises from 6095 in 1900 to 16,011 in 1930 (37.7% of the total area of ​​the state): of these 7308 were equipped with irrigation, which develops for 541,000 ha. especially in the basins of the Big Horn, North Platte and Green rivers. Agriculture mainly concerns cereals, potatoes, fodder, which allow the breeding of 149,000 horses, 1 million cattle, of which 92,000 dairy, 78,000 pigs and 3,614,000 sheep, for which the production of raw wool. Wyoming has great importance for its mines (5282 workers employed in 1929), especially as regards the hard coal of excellent quality, with a production of 6.2 million metric tons in the period 1911-1915, of 5.9 million in the years 1926-1930. To this was added oil, whose production has risen from 35. 490 hectoliters in the period 1901-1910 to 35.7 million in the years 1926-1930. The region of greatest production is the Salt Creek District, 64 km. north of Casper, from which an oil pipeline (1924) departs which through Nebraska and Kansas reaches Freeman in Missouri with a length of 1126 km. Industries, on the other hand, are of little importance: 2060 workers in 1899, 6258 in 1929, mainly employed in railway construction and oil refining (1679 workers). The railways measure 3276 km., Mostly managed by Chicago Burlington and Quincy and Union Pacific Railways; of great importance is the line that crosses the southern part of the state, a section of the great artery of parallels, which leads from Chicago to Seattle on the Pacific. Vehicles rose from 1,584 units in 1913 to 52,560 in 1933. of great importance is the line that crosses the southern part of the state, a section of the great artery of parallels, which leads from Chicago to Seattle on the Pacific. Vehicles rose from 1,584 units in 1913 to 52,560 in 1933. of great importance is the line that crosses the southern part of the state, a section of the great artery of parallels, which leads from Chicago to Seattle on the Pacific. Vehicles rose from 1,584 units in 1913 to 52,560 in 1933.

History

The Wyoming territory was made up of parts ceded by Louisiana (1803), the Oregon area and the Mexican cession of 1848. Whether the Spaniards came to this area is very uncertain; the first sure explorers were the French (La Verendrye in 1743-44). John Colter discovered the Yellowstone Park area in 1807, and Fort Laramie was built in 1834. From 1842 the Pacific immigration route passed through Wyoming, but few stopped there, with the exception of about fifty Mormons on the Green River in 1853, for a few years. In 1867, gold was discovered, and a great influx of population followed, against which the Indians rose several times, who were finally tamed only in 1879. Meanwhile, on July 25, 1868, Congress had created the Wyoming Territory with the current borders: part was taken from Dakota, part from Utah and part from Idaho; Cheyenne was chosen as the capital. The vote given to women was never taken away, and Wyoming was the first state to have a woman as a governor. On July 10, 1890, Wyoming was admitted to the Union as a state, with a territory the size of Italy and a population of 62,555. The life of the state was almost always quiet: however in 1885 there were anti-Chinese agitations, and in 1892 fights between the small owners and the owners of the large herds of cattle, which culminated in the with a territory as large as Italy and a population of 62,555 inhabitants. The life of the state was almost always quiet: however in 1885 there were anti-Chinese agitations, and in 1892 fights between the small owners and the owners of the large herds of cattle, which culminated in the with a territory as large as Italy and a population of 62,555 inhabitants. The life of the state was almost always quiet: however in 1885 there were anti-Chinese agitations, and in 1892 fights between the small owners and the owners of the large herds of cattle, which culminated in the Johnson county raid.

Cheyenne

Cheyenne is a city of the USA (55,731 residents In 2005), and capital of the state of Wyoming, on the river Crow, at 1848 m asl It has a decidedly mountainous climate (-3.8 ° C in January; 19.5 ° C in July) and scarce rainfall (380 mm per year). Remarkable road and railway center. Agricultural and livestock market (cattle, sheep) and industrial center (petrochemical, railway equipment factories, meat canneries). It was founded in 1867.

Wyoming Facts and History

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