Tennessee Facts and History

Abbreviated as TN, Tennessee is one of the four states of the SE Center. the United States, bordering north with Kentucky and Virginia, south with Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi (mathematical limits); to the east with North Carolina; to the West with Arkansas and Missouri (natural limits); it covers an area of ​​108,833 square kilometers and is entirely included in the Mississippi basin. Several natural regions can be distinguished in the territory. Proceeding from east to west, on the edge of North Carolina, there is the most mountainous section of the state, with the chains of the Appalachian system (Unaka Mountains; Great Smoky), with peaks above 2000 m., Made up of crystalline rocks, which it follows westwards the so-called East Tennessee Valley, a section of the great Appalachian valley, with a prevalent northeast -SO direction, crossed by the Tennessee River, of great anthropogenic and economic value, limited to the west by the Cumberland Plateau, which has an average height of 600 m., rich in coal, engraved by numerous rivers, including important in the southern section the Sequatchie. The Rimlands follow westwards (250-300 m. High), limiting the central basin, of great economic value; further west the Tennessee valley, which crosses the state from south to north, with an average width of 20 km., at a height of about 100 m. The western section of the state is a plateau (150 m. Of average altitude), engraved by numerous watercourses, draining into the Mississippi, whose valley floor is wide, rich in lakes and ponds, in which it winds in serpentine the great river is limited by a series of steep slopes. average width of 20 km., at a height of about 100 m. The western section of the state is a plateau (150 m. Of average altitude), engraved by numerous watercourses, draining into the Mississippi, whose valley floor is wide, rich in lakes and ponds, in which it winds in serpentine the great river is limited by a series of steep slopes. average width of 20 km., at a height of about 100 m. The western section of the state is a plateau (150 m. Of average altitude), engraved by numerous watercourses, draining into the Mississippi, whose valley floor is wide, rich in lakes and ponds, in which it winds in serpentine the great river is limited by a series of steep slopes.

The climate of the state is warm temperate: the annual average is 8 °, 8 and rises from east to west in inverse relationship with the altimetry; the winters are lukewarm (3rd, 5th in January); hot summers (25 ° in July), with the highest values ​​in the Mississippi valley; abundant rainfall with an average value of 1250 mm. per year, mainly in winter and spring, distribution very favorable to vegetation and agriculture.

The territory sends the waters to the Tennessee (v.) And Cumberland rivers, a tributary of the Ohio (v.), And directly to the Mississippi in the western part: these arteries have great importance as communication routes and for the production of electricity. The state’s population rose from 35,691 in 1790 to 681,904 in 1830, to 1,002,717 in 1850, to 2,020,616 in 1900, to 2,616,556 in 1930. In that year 81.7% of the population was consisting of Whites (of whom 99.4% were indigenous or born to parents who were partially or totally foreign; 0.6 were born abroad, in all 13,066 individuals, mainly English), 18.3% from color elements. The density of the state is 24 residents per sq. km. About twenty of the 100 counties into which Tennessee is divided exceed that value; four counties then have more than 100 residents per sq. km, due to the presence of large urban centers (Davidson, Hamilton, Knox, Shetty). Eight cities exceeded 10,000 inhabitants in 1930; four the 100,000: Knoxville, with 105,802 residents; Chattanooga, with 119,798 inhabitants, both on the Tennessee River; Nashville, the capital, with 153,866 residents on the Cumberland River; Memphis, with 253,143 residents on the left bank of the Mississippi, which is home to the largest Italian colony in the state.

Tennessee has great economic importance especially for agriculture. The number of farms it rose from 224,623 in 1900 to 245,657 in 1930, with an area equal to 67.5% of the total area of ​​the state. The main agricultural products concern cereals (corn, wheat), potatoes, gardening products, fruit growing, cotton, but above all tobacco, for which the state occupies the 3rd place in the Union after North Carolina, and Kentucky, with a production of about 500,000 quintals in the period 1932-1934 (continuously increasing). Livestock breeding is intense. Forests are also widespread, covering an area of ​​about 60,000 square kilometers, mainly broad-leaved trees (oaks, American walnuts, poplars, etc.), so the timber and furniture industry is flourishing. Given the geological nature of the land, some areas of the state are rich in minerals. Coal leads the way with a production of about 5 million metric tons in the period 1926-1930, obtained from six main counties in the Cumberland Plateau; followed by copper and zinc, phosphates, marble and building materials. Industries are of great importance. The textile and mechanical industries (railway material, motor vehicles) prevail; the wood and furniture industries. Of considerable importance is the hydroelectric development.  The most industrial cities are Nashville, Knoxville, Memphis, Chattanooga, which are also the main railway centers. The railway lines had a development of 2016 km. in 1860 and 6275 in 1933; the first line was built in 1837. To these must be added the waterways (Tennessee, Cumberland, Mississippi).

History

The territory that today constitutes the state of Tennessee was used as a hunting area for various Indian tribes. In 1768 a group of these, the Six Nations, ceded its rights to the English crown, but this could not constitute a valid title. In 1769 a certain William Bean (or Been) built a cabin near the confluence of Watauga and Boone’s Creek. Later a steady stream of immigration began, which was organized in 1772 under the name of the Watauga Association. After a vain attempt to become an independent royal colony, at the outbreak of the revolution the inhabitants obtained in 1776 the annexation to North Carolina with the name of Washington District, which in 1777 became Washington County, with Mississippi as its western border. After various conventions that did not have definitive results, in 1790 North Carolina ceded land “south of the Ohio River” to the federal government, which was organized as a territory with Knoxville as its capital, of which William Blount was governor. Having a population of more than 60,000 from the first census of 1795, Tennessee was formed into state, and admitted to the Union as the sixteenth state, on June 1, 1796. During the civil war the state joined the rebels, but the Eastern and a part of the center of the state petitioned Congress, which was rejected, to be readmitted to the Union. Many battles from this war took place in its territory, including those of Shilo, Murfreesboro, Chattanooga, Chickamauga and Nashville. After the war, Tennessee was the first rebel state re-admitted to the Union (July 24, 1866).

Tennessee Facts and History

Memphis

Memphis is a city of the USA, in the State of Tennessee. Fort founded by the French at the end of the century. 17th, was ceded to the Spaniards in 1763 and then entered the English colonial domain. When (1818) the Chickasaws gave up the territory east of the Mississippi, the present city was built, which suffered from civil war and post-war tensions, but grew considerably in the following century.

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